WUBBA LUBBA DUB DUB!

Review:

Over the last few years, Virtual Reality has become ubiquitous in the gaming industry initially piquing interest with gamers with the introduction of the Oculus and the HTC Vive offering initial games through the Steam platform, VIVE and the Oculus Rift. This was later followed by Sony through their PlayStation VR and soon other developers through Microsofts Mixed Reality Headset.

Which is why I decided to dive into the realm of VR by purchasing a VIVE and trying out the games available to the platform with great excitement.

One of the games I’ve been dying to get my hands on is Rick and Morty Virtual Rick-ality since I’m a big fan of the show and I was curious to explore the world through the lens of VR. I started the game with several questions in mind and these are:

 

  • What are the gameplay mechanics in VR
  • How would you build a game in the Rick and Morty universe?
  • How would you navigate in VR space
  • What are your goals?

The game starts by placing you in the living room, allowing you to explore, grab and analyze the objects in the room, without being able to move around the entire house. You start levels by inserting game disks into an old fashioned DVD player next to a tv screen, one of the levels I played introduced me as a “Clone Morty” a clone of Ricks assistant that’s expendable as Rick has me doing Laundry as the first task of the game, after which he decides to kill me and I respawn back to the garage after a few seconds in “Morty Purgatory” to do more tasks from Rick

From a standpoint the game basically has me doing tasks that Rick otherwise wouldn’t normally do. Change batteries, refill stuff, combine two objects, carry items and a lot more activities that sound like they would be done in the real world. But I rather had fun doing these activities because it introduced me to the capabilities of VR, where I can be able to interact with objects the same way I would in the real world. The only problem I have with the goals was that there was no sense of urgency.

I started the game with Rick telling me not to touch things in which I do and later realized I could actually not just touch objects in the room but I can interact with them in fun and odd ways.

Aside from the main goals that Rick tells me to do, the side rules are basically to explore the space and immerse myself in the Rick and Morty Universe.

Among the core rules of the game is that you can’t move away from the space you’re assigned to, so if I’m in the Garage, I’m in the Garage and I can’t go to the living room. This feels quite limiting as I want to explore the space as much as I want to.

Play action for this game ranges from

  • Visible, which is whats obviously stated by Rick
  • Hidden, where there are odd little quirks, like breaking a glass and stabbing yourself would bring you back to Morty Purgatory or drink liquid soap would cause your character to puke.

Most of the challenges in the game are quite rudimentary, where doing laundry, requires you to find soap, charging batteries require you to find batteries and the charger. They’re more of mini quests within a limited space, but what makes them engaging is that they exist in VR space, letting you lose yourself as you play the game.

The mechanics to solve these challenges are initially introduced to you in the form of tutorials of discovery, however, due to the varieties of combinations, it’s easy to miss a tutorial mechanic early in the game which would lead to problems in solving puzzles outside the tutorial paradigm.

Plus the Rick through the phone watch isn’t really all that helpful.

Despite the game itself existing in the Rick and Morty universe where most of the time the show tries to subvert tropes and introduce 4th wall breaking, the game itself doesn’t do much of that as compared to other games like the Stanley Parable. The game basically lets you do meaningless goals which are just day to day chores in the real world often by which Rick is trying to prove, that their world isn’t as much different compared to yours, only that they have portals and the chores exist in different dimensions.

At the end, this game would be great to recommend to a Rick and Morty fan but not someone who is new to the series.

It’s also a great game to introduce someone to the world of VR but I don’t feel too convinced it’s one of the good games to introduce someone to VR 100% of the time. So yeah Rick and Morty Virtual Rickality is immersive as I did the chores and odd tasks but after awhile I wanted to leave the game and not do anything anymore.

Tagged: and, class, course, design, game, morty, of, parsons, review, rick, rickality, school, student, virtual